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In photos: Andreas Kay’s spectacular bugs

  • Written by  geographical
  • Published in Geophoto
Green jumping spider commonly known as the magnolia green jumper (Lyssomanes viridis), adults measure between five to eight millimetres in length and can leap up to four times their own body length Green jumping spider commonly known as the magnolia green jumper (Lyssomanes viridis), adults measure between five to eight millimetres in length and can leap up to four times their own body length
31 Jan
2020
German physicist, biologist and photographer, Andreas Kay was based in Ecuador and chronicled the country’s amazing array of small creatures, creating a 28,000-image strong photographic collection. Diagnosed with glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive forms of brain cancer, Kay, 59,  passed away last year, leaving behind an unparalleled body of research and imagery...
WEBtortoise beetle

 

Golden Tortoise Beetle 

Commonly known as ‘goldbugs’, the Charidotella sexpunctata typically grow to just 7mm in length and will change colour during their development or when disturbed.


WEBcockroach wasp

Emerald Cockroach Wasp

The Ampulex compressa is known for its unusual reproductive method which involves stinging a cockroach and using it as a host for its larvae.


WEBjumping spider

Jumping Spider

There are 21 species of Beata jumping spiders found throughout the Americas. Although no bigger than a thumbnail, eight eyes give the species some of the best vision among all arthropods.


WEBJewel Caterpillar

Jewel Caterpillar

A moth of the family Dalceridae, the Minacraga argentata’s more familiar name is due to the colourful bead-like gelatinous mass covering the exoskeleton.


WEBjumping spider and leaf footed bug

Jumping Spider and Leaf-Footed Bug

The Parnaenus cyanidens is a form of jumping spider first discovered in 1896. The leaf-footed bug (of the Coreidae genus) feeds mainly on leaf and tree sap.


WEBMonkey hopper

Monkey Hopper

A grasshopper in the Eumastacidae family, the Eumastax vittata napoana has legs that jut at right angles to its body and is mostly found perched at high elevations primarily on tree ferns.


WEBtree hopper

Tree Hopper

The thorax of the  Membracidae family often expand into fantastic shapes, often akin to tree thorns, as a form of camouflage.

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