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What to read while in lockdown: Geographical’s top picks

  • Written by  Geographical
  • Published in Nature
What to read while in lockdown: Geographical’s top picks
25 Mar
2020
What better time to get reading? We’ve collected some of our favourite books from over the years, a collection of certifiable classics and a few lesser-known delights. Dive right on in...

HOW TO ARGUE WITH A RACIST by Adam Rutherford

In How To Argue With A Racist, science writer Adam Rutherford takes us through the historic and current research that has sought, and still seeks, to tackle the question of how genes link to questions of race. Rutherford brings the entire idea of race into contention, asserting that it is a social construct, with little basis in scientific reality.

Click here to read the full review


WHERE THERE’S A WILL by Emily Chappell 

As if cycling 4,000km across Europe wasn’t challenging enough, the entrants of the Transcontinental amateur cycling race attempt to complete it in the shortest number of days possible meaning sleep is snatched in bus stops, cafés and fields. 

Click here to read the full review


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THERE IS NO PLANET B by Mike Berners-Lee

If you’re looking for a guide to all things climate change, look no further. 

Click here for the full review


UNDERLAND: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane

Underland is an epic, perspective-shifting exploration of the world beneath our feet. 

Click here for the full review


TURNING THE TIDE ON PLASTIC by Lucy Siegle

Unapologetically instructive – if just 12 people followed Siegle’s advice they’d avoid up to 15,000 pieces of plastic each year, taking us all a little closer to her dream of clean seas. 

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PRISONERS OF GEOGRAPHY by Tim Marshall

Divided into 10 key global regions, Marshall examines geopolitics through the prism of geography, ‘the most overlooked’ factor in the analysis of world affairs, explaining how mountains, rivers, deserts and plains have dictated the course of human history. 

Click here for the full review


YOU ARE HERE: A Brief Guide to the World by Nicholas Crane

‘Our planet is mid-chapter and we are the authors of its destiny,' writes Nicholas Crane, geographer, traveller, cyclist, author and broadcaster. He’s dug deep into his rucksack-of-life to share, in compact form, a readable risk assessment of our collective home, evolving from cosmic dust, 4.6 billion years ago. 

Click here for the full review


SAPIENS: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

A well-deserved classic – this one will keep you busy.

Click here for the full review


FROM HERE TO ETERNITY: Travelling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

Caitlin Doughty, a professional mortician based in Los Angeles, set out to understand why Americans – alongside much of the ‘developed’ world – are increasingly paying through the nose for what seems the least comforting and most isolating (as well as boring) of funeral practices.

Click here for the full review


LAND OF THE DAWN-LIT MOUNTAINS by Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent

Exploring India’s most forgotten corner, Arunachal Pradesh in the far northeast,  Bolingbroke-Kent promises access to a world where shamans ‘fly through the night’, where tribes still live in tight-knit communities (just) and where even yetis may tread. Because the writing is honest, and the emotional and physical challenges are laid bare, we get to really travel by proxy. 

Click here for the full review


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