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WILDLIFE

A WWF report has revealed that global forest vertebrate populations have declined by 53 per cent since 1970, raising questions about the methods used to measure forest regeneration
Around 75 million birds are kept as pets in Indonesia, threatening to wipe out some wild bird populations
Migratory animals are actively adjusting their traditions to cope with the environmental crisis, new research has found
After years of trials, talks, tweaks and test runs, EarthRanger has now come of age and is being rolled out across Africa. But can the brainchild of the co-founder of Microsoft make a serious difference in the fight against the…
A look at the contribution of hippos to the savannah ecosystem has revealed that their preferred lifestyle is crucial for maintaining life in the rivers they laze in
The new app encourages young children to connect with the natural world while allowing scientists to track levels of biodiversity across the UK
Could grey seals singing Twinkle Twinkle Little Star help develop a new system for studying speech disorders?
Celebrities and animal welfare groups have been expressing their disappointment online about Japan’s pledge to restart its whaling activities this year
 A ten-year analysis of chimpanzees has revealed that the presence of humans diminishes behavioural diversity, leading to calls for a new approach to conservation
The return of the pine marten to UK forests has been celebrated as a win for the red squirrel, but some scientists advise caution
A surge in reports of dead hares has resulted in the discovery of a hidden disease in UK populations
Two whale populations on either side of the African continent have been found to share passages of song
An innovative project to utilise Laos’ elephant experts in service of protecting the country’s natural treasures is waiting on just one thing – government approval
Javan rhinos survived the recent Krakatoa tsunami, but the species might not be so lucky next time
A tightening of restrictions on the insecticides known as neonicotinoids has brought hope that the decline in honey bees and wild pollinators can be reversed. Yet concerns are growing as to how new technology could radically change the landscape. Are we…
Bonnethead sharks, the second smallest member of the hammerhead family, have been shown to not only eat, but digest seagrass, making them the first omnivorous shark known to scientists
The recent discovery of more than 200 million termite mounds in northeastern Brazil, the extent of which had never been understood before, throws up more questions than it answers

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