Our directory of things of interest

University Directory

Southend Pier: a lengthy icon of the Victorian British seaside

Southend Pier at sunset. Completed in 1890, Southend Pier is the longest pier in the world Southend Pier at sunset. Completed in 1890, Southend Pier is the longest pier in the world
07 Sep
2020
For this month's Discovering Britain viewpoint Rory Walsh takes a short look at a long pier

Stretching out to sea for 1.3 miles, Southend Pier is the longest in the world. Walking to the end and back is almost the same distance as climbing the Matterhorn. On a hot day it can seem as challenging. Most visitors let the pier train take the strain, before cooling off with an ice cream, or perhaps sending a postcard from the pier’s own letterbox. When the train is running...

Completed in 1890, Southend Pier is an icon of the Victorian British seaside. Sir John Betjeman summarised its physical and cultural immensity: ‘The Pier is Southend, Southend is the Pier.’ Its famous length grew from a greater numbers game. ‘Seaside resorts were built on mass tourism. They make money by attracting as many visitors as possible,’ says Dr Anya Chapman, senior lecturer in tourism management at Bournemouth University. 

At the start of the Victorian leisure boom, most visitors arrived at the coast by sea. ‘Piers were the transport hubs of their day,’ Chapman explains, ‘before the railways, piers brought the tourists.’ Southend had a disadvantage. At low tide, the sea retreats by a mile, while at high tide the water level rarely tops six metres. This tidal range meant large ships, including tourist steamers, couldn’t dock at Southend. Faced with losing valuable revenue, the solution was a record-breaking pier. 

As rail travel increased, seaside piers evolved into leisure attractions. Ship stages became show stages. By the 1940s around four million visitors trod the boards each year at Southend. Numbers fell with the rise of European package holidays. Britain’s piers faced being washed away by the tide of changing tastes. In 1980 Southend Pier closed. Campaigners saved it from the threat of demolition and it has since been restored. 

Today, the pier is owned by the local council. Last year they allocated £16 million to invest in the structure. Piers are expensive to maintain. Wood rots, metal rusts and insurance costs are huge. Besides the elements, piers are constantly exposed to storms, fires and boat strikes. And this summer, they face another threat.

Covid-19 saw piers closed despite glorious weather, including over Easter and the May bank holidays. ‘The peak summer season is usually 12 weeks,’ says Chapman. ‘Lockdown and restrictions since have effectively cut that to just two and a half because most piers are now operating at about 40 per cent capacity’. Southend Pier reopened to visitors on 6 July. A socially distanced train service resumed at the end of the month.

‘These are difficult times for all piers. A lot of them are going to struggle,’ Chapman says. Does the pandemic threaten the end of the British seaside pier? Some are already adapting. Chapman cites Hastings Pier: ‘Critics called it “the Plank” because there was nothing on it. But its open spaces have become an asset, especially for safe outdoor dining.’ 

Before Covid-19, piers were already diversifying to broaden their appeal. Attractions on offer now range from aquariums to zipwires. And these seaside structures still provide a timeless pleasure. ‘The lure of the sea has been with us for centuries and piers offer a simple thrill, of being able to walk on water.’ Of the hundred or so Victorian piers, 61 survive with 56 open to the public. Hopefully pleasure seekers will enjoy them for many more summers to come.

Stay connected with the Geographical newsletter!
signup buttonIn these turbulent times, we’re committed to telling expansive stories from across the globe, highlighting the everyday lives of normal but extraordinary people. Stay informed and engaged with Geographical.

Get Geographical’s latest news delivered straight to your inbox every Friday!

Related items

Julysub 2020

geo line break v3

Free eBooks - Geographical Newsletter

geo line break v3

EDUCATION PARTNERS

DurhamBath Spa600x200 Greenwich Aberystwythherts

TRAVEL PARTNERS

Ponant

Silversea

Travel the Unknown

NEVER MISS A STORY - Follow Geographical on Social

Want to stay up to date with breaking Geographical stories? Join the thousands following us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and stay informed about the world.

More articles in UK...

Discovering Britain

For this month's Discovering Britain viewpoint Rory Walsh takes a…

Discovering Britain

Who was John Muir? How did his views and philosophy…

Discovering Britain

For July's Discovering Britain viewpoint Rory Walsh hears about a…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain, Rory Walsh visits several places…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint Rory Walsh visits a…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain Trail, Rory Walsh explores a…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint, Rory Walsh explores birdlife…

UK

Ian Boyd, once a member of the Science Advisory Group for…

Discovering Britain

We’re all keeping ourselves to ourselves for now, but not…

UK

According to the World Conservation Union, Britain’s national parks ‘only…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint Rory Walsh looks below…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain, Rory Walsh explores London’s weird…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint, Rory Walsh visits the…

UK

The story of Margate is one of early success, severe…

UK

In a bid to boost its green credentials and make…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain trail, Rory Walsh follows fictional…

UK

Badger culling is on the rise again this year, with…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain viewpoint, Rory Walsh visits a…

UK

Growing tea in the UK could have a number of…

Discovering Britain

For this month’s Discovering Britain trail, Rory Walsh visits a…