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'No Net Loss' policies aim to offset ecological damage caused by development projects, but trade-offs are not always successful. Is it possible to fully offset ecological damages of development projects, and how do we overcome the ethical issues of trade-offs in nature? 
Who was John Muir? How did his views and philosophy change the world? And what connection does he have with Dunbar? In this month's Discovering Britain focus, Rory Walsh retraces the footsteps of this renowned naturalist, botanist and explorer
Anjana Khatwa is an earth scientist, presenter and advocate for diversity in the geographical, geoscience and nature conservation sectors. As part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site team, she helped to setup a sustainable education programme to engage the community with the geography of their land. She uses her passion for the science to broaden the reach of geography in the modern day. 
Katie Burton explores the practicalities and ethics of geoengineering, the controversial science that could quickly cool the atmosphere. Is it the last ditch climate solution that nobody wants? Or are appetites for geoengineering solutions growing with our warming climate?
The impacts of deforestation are wide ranging. But while some are well-known, a link with malaria is only just coming to light. Could appetites for deforestation-implicated products, such as coffee and timber, be driving malaria risk in vulnerable countries? 
The creation of an Exclusive Economic Zone stretching from Turkey's southwest coast down to the northern tip of Libya has bubbled old and new conflicts in the Eastern Mediterranean. Tim Marshall investigates the recent developments underpinning rising tensions in the region
Though the pandemic has gripped the world's attention, lying just in reach is an opportunity to radically restructure our energy system
Genome sequencing has become one of the main methods for tracking how coronavirus is moving through communities. The technique identifies subtle differences called mutations that a virus picks up over time. Despite facing criticism for its handling of the pandemic, the UK is leading the charge on genome sequencing. Efforts are starting to gain insights on how the UK's epidemic was seeded with imports from other countries
Sand is the single most mined commodity. Used to make concrete, its extraction eclipses other metals and minerals by a huge margin. Yet while it is abundant, it is not infinite. Fears that some sand deposits are being overused, combined with increasing evidence that the dredging of rivers and seafloors causes vast damage to ecosystems and coastal communities, bring the sustainability of this vital material into question

Dossier: carbon offsetting

The IPCC embraced the notion of carbon offset schemes in the landmark Paris Agreement, but projects have faced criticism that they lack effectiveness and transparency. Mark Rowe investigates the world of carbon offsetting to determine the role it really plays on the path towards net zero
The shortlist for the 2020 Wellcome Photography Prize has been announced, with a series of photographs depicting the annual floods in Lagos among the candidates
A report by Global Witness has revealed that conflict gold could be entering the products of major household brands
Millions have been displaced due to severe floods in central and southern China
A portable DNA assay could revolutionise the way border officials examine suspected wildlife products, and the methods conservationists use to identify wildlife samples in the field
A handy gathering of facts about carbon emissions with graphs by Our World in Data

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